pizza-kity:

mom said watch this flower

Reblogged from whoops

metaphorwaters:

Anna Popplewell | THAT Magazine

Reblogged from #DareToBewbrito

a-whoa-oh:

edge-0fheaven:

well fuck you too

Welcome to San Francisco

Reblogged from not a seedy old man

thesonicscrew:

dutchster:

dear moths: if you like the light so much WHY DON’T YOU COME OUT DURING THE FUCKING DAY

imagine if one time they did

and they all flew towards the sun and died

just like

*poof*

no more moths

Reblogged from Liam Dryden
Reblogged from #DareToBewbrito

shawnspenstar:

My friend’s dad used to work at a movie theatre where a lot of celebrities came to apparently and one time Tom Hanks came in and he was feeding tickets into the machine and couldn’t see anything so the guy up top was like “dude, that’s Tom Hanks” and her dad was like “yeah right if that’s Tom Hanks I’ll start eating these tickets” and Tom Hanks leans over the counter and whispers “start eating the tickets” 

Reblogged from whoops

fukkkres:

white people when they drop something: ah fiddlesticks

white people when they win a board game: hooty hoo!!!

Reblogged from whoops
queenelizabeth-jpg:

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

queenelizabeth-jpg:

Eliza Bennett - A woman’s work is never done, 2011

Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.

Reblogged from whoops
awwww-cute:

Yes, I would like a baby goat loaf, please

awwww-cute:

Yes, I would like a baby goat loaf, please

Reblogged from whoops